Mechado, a Filipino Beef Stew, served over a bed of rice in a white bowl.

Simple Sundays | Mechado Filipino Beef Stew

Comfort in the form of a hearty stew can be found in nearly every country’s cuisine, and the Philippines is no different. Mechado, Filipino Beef Stew, is the Philippine’s version of the ubiquitous comfort food with a wonderful depth of flavor that comes from browned garlic, marinated beef, and the complex flavors of patis, or fish sauce.

Mechado, a Filipino Beef Stew, served over a bed of rice in a white bowl.
Simple Sundays | Mechado Filipino Beef Stew

Comfort in the form of a hearty stew can be found in nearly every country’s cuisine, and the Philippines is no different. Mechado, Filipino Beef Stew, is the Philippine’s version of the ubiquitous comfort food with a wonderful depth of flavor that comes from browned garlic, marinated beef, and the complex flavors of patis, or fish sauce.

A white bowl filled with Mechado - Filipino Beef Stew made with beef, chunks of potatoes, and served over rice.

 

Mechado, Filipino Beef Stew

When I first started dating my husband, our mutual friend clued me in — he’s a “beef and potatoes man,” she said. I knew in an instant that Mechado would be the first dish I would cook for him. In my little apartment, on that tiny little stove, I made my ultimate stick-to-your-ribs comfort dish. It seemed very appropriate for that early autumn day in the midwest, with familiar flavors, no matter where you were from.

Fourteen years of marriage later, and I think I made the right choice.

When the weather turns, Mechado comes back in rotation, and the other day, I felt it was time. It was the kind of day I wish I could just stay in and do nothing. Doing nothing is hardly ever an option, but a hearty stew helps. Low and slow, braising chunks of beef into fork tender morsels with chunks of potatoes is my idea of fall cooking, don’t you agree?

A white bowl filled with Mechado - Filipino Beef Stew made with beef, chunks of potatoes, and served over rice.

More Beef Recipes

Simple Sundays | Beef and Lentil Chili
Prime Rib Beef and Lentil Soup
Simple Sundays | Shaking Beef Vietnamese Stir Fry
Sweet & Smoky Spanish Beef Burgers With Pickled Saffron Pears
Mushroom and Short Rib Noodle Soup

More Filipino Recipes

Filipino Crispy Tofu and Mushroom Adobo
Ensaymada: Filipino Brioche Bread
Filipino Pork Adobo
Instant Pot Beef Nilaga (Filipino Beef and Vegetable Soup)
Puto: Filipino Steamed Rice Cakes

Mechado - Filipino Beef Stew www.kitchenconfidante | Comfort in the form of a hearty stew can be found in nearly every country’s cuisine, and the Philippines is no different. Mechado is the Philippine version of the ubiquitous comfort food with a wonderful depth of flavor that comes from browned garlic, marinated beef, and the complex flavors of patis, or fish sauce.

Mechado Filipino Beef Stew

Comfort in the form of a hearty stew can be found in nearly every country’s cuisine, and the Philippines is no different. Mechado is the Philippine version of the ubiquitous comfort food with a wonderful depth of flavor that comes from browned garlic, marinated beef, and the complex flavors of patis, or fish sauce. When I first started dating my husband, having heard that he was a “beef and potatoes man,” I knew in an instant that Mechado would be the first dish I would cook for him. Over ten years of marriage later, and I think I made the right choice.
Mechado, a Filipino Beef Stew, served over a bed of rice in a white bowl.
Print This Pin This
4.82 from 11 votes
Course Main Course
Cuisine Filipino
Prep Time 30 minutes
Cook Time 1 hour 20 minutes
Total Time 1 hour 50 minutes
Servings 4 servings
Calories 567kcal

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 lbs beef for stew
  • juice of half a lemon
  • 1/4 cup good dark soy sauce I like Silver Swan, found in Asian markets
  • freshly ground black pepper to taste
  • 3 tablespoons canola oil
  • 3 cloves garlic minced or crushed
  • 1 medium onion diced
  • 1 teaspoon fish sauce (patis)
  • 1 cup tomato sauce
  • 1 1/2 cups water
  • several dashes of Tabasco
  • 2-3 cups beef stock
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 red bell pepper sliced
  • 2 russet potatoes peeled and cut into 2 inch chunks
  • 2 carrots peeled and chopped in 2 inch pieces
  • kosher salt
  • freshly ground black pepper

Instructions

  • Marinate beef in soy sauce, lemon, and black pepper for at least 30 minutes.
  • Brown garlic in oil and set aside.
  • Brown beef, working in batches if necessary (reserve the marinade).
  • Return beef to pot, add onions and season with fish sauce (patis).
  • When the onions are wilted, add tomato sauce and water and stir.
  • After about two minutes, add Tabasco, beef stock, 2 tablespoons of reserved marinade, bay leaves and bell pepper.
  • Let come to a boil, then lower heat to simmer. Add reserved garlic. Cover the pot with the lid, and let it stew for about 1 1/2 hours (see notes), stirring occasionally.
  • When the meat is tender, add potatoes and carrots. Continue cooking until the potatoes are fork tender, about 20 minutes more.
  • Season with salt and pepper to taste. Serve over rice.

Video

Notes

Note on simmering the stew: In general, it takes about 45 minutes for the meat to just start getting tender. Check the beef at this time and continue cooking as necessary. I usually try to simmer for about 45 minutes to an hour, longer if I want it really tender – the longer it cooks, the better it tastes.
Using a pressure cooker (e.g. Instant Pot): Mechado is delicious when made in a pressure cooker. At the point where it is time to simmer the stew, cook in a pressure cooker for 30 minutes at high pressure. Then add the potatoes and carrots and cook again for about 10-15 minutes on high pressure. Allow the mechado to simmer in your pressure cooker, uncovered, afterward to reduce the liquid a bit more.

Nutrition

Calories: 567kcal | Carbohydrates: 32g | Protein: 54g | Fat: 24g | Saturated Fat: 5g | Cholesterol: 132mg | Sodium: 1581mg | Potassium: 1486mg | Fiber: 4g | Sugar: 8g | Vitamin A: 6290IU | Vitamin C: 52.9mg | Calcium: 68mg | Iron: 6.6mg
Did you make this recipe?I'd love to see! Tag @kitchconfidante on Instagram and hashtag it #kitchenconfidante

Comments

Recipe Rating




This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

  1. Mary

    5 stars
    Can this be made in a crockpot? I love this i cant remember the exact recipe but this use to be cooked in my house at least 2 times a week its one of my favorite Filipino dishes.

    Reply
    • Liren Baker

      Hi Mary! Yes, you can definitely make it in a crockpot – I use my slow cooker often! I cook per usual until step 7 in the recipe, where it can simmer in the slow cooker until tender, then add the vegetables and continue cooking until the potatoes are done. Enjoy!!

      Reply
    • Liren Baker

      Hi Jing – you can substitute your favorite hot sauce. Sriracha also works! And if you prefer no heat at all, you can also leave it out. Enjoy!

      Reply
    • Jewel

      5 stars
      Simmering as I’m typing. Everything I need is readily available in the house. I’m betting it will turn out so yummy! Thank you so much for the recipe.

      Reply
  2. Jacob Petrosky

    5 stars
    We made this recipe last night. It’s super yummy. We made a large batch and froze some of it for later. Always nice to have some tasty Filipino food in the freezer when you’re lazy to cook it from scratch. Thank you for the recipe.

    Reply
    • Liren Baker

      I’m so glad you enjoyed it, Jacob! It’s definitely a great, freezer-friendly meal! Thank you so much for coming back to let me know you made it!

      Reply
  3. Julie ann

    5 stars
    I love this recipe❤️ Thank you so much for sharing this

    Reply
  4. Val

    Mechado means “wick.” I was taught that mechado has a wick of fat through the beef to help tenderize and flavor it. While your marinade sounds flavorful, where is the wick for which this dish is named?

    Reply
    • Liren Baker

      Hi Val, you’re right, the Spanish origins of “mecha” does mean to wick — this version does eliminate the larding of the beef, which is a common shortcut these days. I feel that the beef for stew, when braised provides a very flavorful dish without the extra fat! I hope this helps!

      Reply
Kitchen Confidante®

Kitchen Confidante uses cookies to serve you the best possible experience. By using our website, we understand that you accept their use and agree to our cookie policy.

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

Close