Grilled dry aged rib eye steaks resting on a slate platter with grilled tomatoes, garlic, and garlic butter.

Grilled Dry Aged Steak

Grilled Dry Aged Steak – a dry aged steak is so special, simple is best when it comes to cooking! Learn how to grill dry aged rib eye steak to juicy perfection!

Grilled dry aged rib eye steaks resting on a slate platter with grilled tomatoes, garlic, and garlic butter.
Grilled Dry Aged Steak

Grilled Dry Aged Steak – a dry aged steak is so special, simple is best when it comes to cooking! Learn how to grill dry aged steak to juicy perfection!

This is a sponsored post written by me on behalf of Safeway. All opinions are 100% mine.

Grilled dry aged rib eye steaks resting on a slate platter with grilled tomatoes, garlic, and garlic butter.

Steak is considered a special occasion at our house. I don’t cook it as often as the meat lovers in my family would like, but when I do, I make sure we are getting the best steak ever! For me, that means splurging on a beautiful rib eye.

The moment that rib eye hits the grill, the aroma greets your nose, and your tastebuds just know that each bite of tender beef will be mouthwateringly satisfying!

Now, what could be better than the perfect rib eye steak? The answer would be dry aged rib eye! The dry aging process allows cuts of beef to age in a temperature and humidity-controlled environment for a period of weeks to months. As moisture is removed from the cut of beef, the result is a more flavorful and tender steak. Dry-aged meat varies in flavor, depending on the cut of the meat and the length of time it has been aged. Similar to aging cheese or wine, more time results in more flavor!

Where to buy dry aged steak

Until recently, if I wanted dry-aged beef, I would have to source it from a specialty butcher or visit my favorite steak house. Imagine my surprise when my local Safeway added a dry ager to their premium offerings! Not only did they add a selection of dry aged sub-primal cuts, the entire butcher department now has an expansive selection of meats and prepared options from which to choose!

I opted for dry-aged ribeye, my favorite cut thanks to its even and rich marbling, resulting in a tender, flavorful, and juicy steak. The boneless ribeye steaks are perfectly trimmed and ready for the grill! Safeway also has dry aged top loin New York strip steaks, which look equally beautiful!

The butcher always include notes on when the piece of meat has been processed, and for how long it is available. How convenient that they now age beef in-house so I can find the perfect steak close to home!

And of course, now that my neighborhood Safeway was upgraded with premium shopping experiences, everything I need to make a steak dinner special is just footsteps away! Fresh herbs and produce round out the meal, appetizers from the deli make things convenient, and don’t forget wine from the wine department and dessert from the new patisserie! 

Dry aged rib eye steaks on a wooden board.

How to grill dry aged steak

Prep the steaks and grill:

Bring the steaks to room temperature; this usually takes 20-30 minutes after removing them from the refrigerator. Since dry aged ribeye steaks are thicker, it needs some time to reduce the chill from the fridge. This will also help cook more evenly.

Pat the steaks on both sides with paper towels to remove excess moisture. Season both sides of the steak generously with kosher salt and pepper. You can also use your favorite steak rub if you wish!

Whether using a charcoal grill or gas grill, preheat your grill to approximately 500°F. Prepare your grill to have a section of direct heat and indirect heat. I find that the best way to grill rib eye steaks is having dual zones of heat on the grill to get that sear on high heat and then to allow the meat to finish cooking over low heat.

Make a garlic butter sauce:

If you choose to make a garlic butter sauce, melt the unsalted butter in a small saucepan over low heat with the garlic, lemon juice, and rosemary. Cook for 1 to 2 minutes until the garlic is fragrant to bring out the garlic’s nutty flavor. Discard the rosemary. Stir in the fresh parsley, and season lightly with salt and pepper.

Grill the steaks:

When you’re ready to grill, clean the hot grill grates with a grill brush. Lightly brush the steaks on both sides with olive oil. Place steaks over high heat to give it a good sear, and cook, covered, for 7 to 8 minutes flipping the steak once.

Move the steak to the low heat area, brush with the garlic butter sauce, and grill uncovered until cooked to your liking (135°F for medium-rare; see temperature chart in FAQs). I recommend using a meat thermometer to check your desired temperature!

Dry aged rib eye steaks on the grill.

Transfer steaks to a cutting board or sheet pan. Let the steak rest for 7 to 8 minutes. Garnish with a sprinkling of sea salt and fresh herbs, if you wish. Slice the steak against the grain to enjoy!

Grilled dry aged rib eye steaks resting on a slate platter with grilled tomatoes, garlic, and garlic butter.

Dry-Aged Steak FAQs

What is dry aged steak?

Dry aging is the process of placing premium cuts of beef in a temperature and humidity-controlled environment for a period of weeks to months. As the beef ages, moisture is removed from the cut of beef, resulting in a more flavorful and tender steak. Dry-aged meat can vary in flavor, depending on the cut of the meat and the length of time it has been aged. Think of the dry aged meat process as similar to aged cheese – more time, less moisture, more concentrated flavor!

What cuts are suited to grilling dry aged beef?

My personal favorite is a rib eye steak, rich in marbling, resulting in a tender, flavorful, and juicy steak. New York Strip is another great cut; it is leaner than a rib eye, and rather than having even marbling throughout, it has a thick band of fat (that isn’t usually eaten). It’s also usually a slightly less expensive cut than the rib eye. Note: if you’re grilling a New York strip steak, you can cook it quickly in one zone of high, direct heat, as opposed to the dual-zone I recommend for the rib eye.

Does dry aged beef cook faster?

Because dry aged beef has less moisture than non-dry-aged beef, it tends to cook in less time. The length of time it has been aged will play a role in this, so check the meat with an instant-read thermometer to determine your level of doneness.

How do I know my steak is done?

Since various factors (steak thickness, temperature, etc.) can impact cook time and steak doneness, I recommend using a digital thermometer. I have the ThermoWorks Classic Thermapen. See below for the internal steak temperatures. I recommend cooking the steak until the internal temperature is 135°F for medium-rare.Steak Temperature Doneness Guide

More Steak Recipes

Miso-Marinated Steak Salad
Grilled Flank Steak and Fingerlings with Chimichurri
Certified Angus Beef® Steak Recipe with Garlic Herb Compound Butter

Sliced grilled dry aged rib eye steaks resting on a slate platter with grilled tomatoes, garlic.

Disclosure: This post was created in partnership with Safeway. Thank you for supporting brands that matter to me; sponsored posts such as this help behind the scenes at Kitchen Confidante. All opinions in this post are, as always, my own.

Grilled Dry Aged Steak

Grilled Dry Aged Steak – a dry aged steak is so special, simple is best when it comes to cooking! Learn how to grill dry aged steak to juicy perfection!
Grilled dry aged rib eye steaks resting on a slate platter with grilled tomatoes, garlic, and garlic butter.
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5 from 1 vote
Course Dinner, Main Course
Cuisine American
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 15 minutes
Resting time 7 minutes
Total Time 32 minutes
Servings 2 people
Calories 584kcal

Ingredients

  • 2 rib-eye steaks, dry-aged 13 oz each, 1 inch to 1 1/4 inch in thickness
  • kosher salt
  • freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • Garlic Butter Sauce optional

Garlic Butter Sauce

  • 4 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 2 cloves garlic minced
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
  • 1 sprig fresh rosemary
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh parsley
  • kosher salt, plus sea salt for garnish
  • freshly ground black pepper
  • fresh herbs, such as rosemary and thyme for garnish, optional

Instructions

Prep the dry aged steaks and grill

  • Bring the steak to room temperature; this usually takes 20-30 minutes after removing it from the refrigerator. Pat the steaks on both sides with a paper towel to remove excess moisture.
  • Season both sides of the steak generously with salt and pepper. You can also use your favorite steak rub if you wish.
  • Preheat and prepare your grill to have a section of direct (high) heat and indirect (low) heat.

Make the Garlic Butter Sauce

  • In a small saucepan, melt the butter over low heat with the garlic, lemon juice, and rosemary. Once the butter is melted, cook for 1 to 2 minutes, until the garlic is fragrant.
  • Discard the rosemary. Stir in the fresh parsley, and season lightly with salt and pepper.

Grill the dry aged steak

  • Clean the grates of the grill with a grill brush.
  • Lightly brush the steaks on both sides with olive oil. Place the steak over high heat, and cook, covered, for 4 to 5 minutes.
  • Flip the steak and cook for 3 to 4 minutes.
  • Move the steak to the area of low heat, brush with the garlic butter sauce (if using), and grill uncovered until the steak is cooked to your liking (135°F for medium-rare; see temperature chart in notes). Transfer to a cutting board to rest for 7 to 8 minutes.
  • Garnish with a sprinkling of sea salt and sprigs of fresh herbs, if you wish. Slice the steak against the grain to enjoy!

Nutrition

Calories: 584kcal | Carbohydrates: 1g | Protein: 46g | Fat: 45g | Saturated Fat: 19g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 3g | Monounsaturated Fat: 22g | Trans Fat: 0.2g | Cholesterol: 153mg | Sodium: 119mg | Potassium: 614mg | Fiber: 0.03g | Sugar: 0.02g | Vitamin A: 210IU | Vitamin C: 0.5mg | Calcium: 20mg | Iron: 4mg
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  1. Sabrina

    5 stars
    a great reminder of what I’ve been missing, and I’ve been making mine with cast iron but it’s definitely time to get the grill out for a change, thank you

    Reply
    • Liren Baker

      Steak in a cast iron is fantastic, too! But yes, it’s nice to grill for a change – you can’t beat that smokey flavor!

      Reply
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