Fig, Honey and Goat Cheese Galette is a fig lover's dream. Nestled in a flaky, buttery crust are sweet figs, tangy goat cheese and sweet honey. Make it while fig season is here.

Fig, Honey and Goat Cheese Galette

Fig, Honey and Goat Cheese Galette is a fig lover’s dream, and one of my favorite ways to enjoy fig season. Nestled in a flaky, buttery crust are sweet figs, tangy goat cheese and drizzles of sweet honey.

Fig, Honey and Goat Cheese Galette is a fig lover's dream. Nestled in a flaky, buttery crust are sweet figs, tangy goat cheese and sweet honey. Make it while fig season is here.
Fig, Honey and Goat Cheese Galette

Fig, Honey and Goat Cheese Galette is a fig lover’s dream. Nestled in a flaky, buttery crust are sweet figs, tangy goat cheese and drizzles of sweet honey. Make it while fig season is here.

Note: This post was originally published July 23, 2010; the recipe has been updated from the archives with a flakier dough, improved kitchen notes and recipe annotation, and updated photographs. I hope you enjoy this favorite from my kitchen.

Fig, Honey and Goat Cheese Galette is a fig lover's dream. Nestled in a flaky, buttery crust are sweet figs, tangy goat cheese and sweet honey. Make it while fig season is here.

Once in a while, late at night when the house is quiet and I should be winding down, resting in bed, I find myself tip-toeing downstairs into the kitchen, looking for a midnight snack. This does not happen often, but when it does, I usually crave one thing in particular.

Fig, Honey and Goat Cheese Galette is a fig lover's dream. Nestled in a flaky, buttery crust are sweet figs, tangy goat cheese and sweet honey. Make it while fig season is here.

Figs.

Fresh, ripe and tender figs, sliced in half, drizzled in honey and eaten with a morsel of goat cheese. To me, that is the ultimate, the perfect midnight snack.

Fig, Honey and Goat Cheese Galette is a fig lover's dream. Nestled in a flaky, buttery crust are sweet figs, tangy goat cheese and sweet honey. Make it while fig season is here.

Fig, Honey and Goat Cheese Galette is a fig lover's dream. Nestled in a flaky, buttery crust are sweet figs, tangy goat cheese and sweet honey. Make it while fig season is here.

Imagine the torture when I have that craving in the middle of January, when figs are just about as rare as fireflies in California.

So when I see the first figs in the markets come summertime, I can’t help but do my own happy dance. It means indulging in a fruit that I find so incredibly satisfying, no matter the preparation. And I do see it as an indulgence, because for some reason, I am the only one who appreciates figs in my house, at least when it’s not in a cookie or bar. When I buy fresh figs, they are all for me.

Fig, Honey and Goat Cheese Galette is a fig lover's dream. Nestled in a flaky, buttery crust are sweet figs, tangy goat cheese and sweet honey. Make it while fig season is here.

Fig, Honey and Goat Cheese Galette is a fig lover's dream. Nestled in a flaky, buttery crust are sweet figs, tangy goat cheese and sweet honey. Make it while fig season is here.

I decided to create a galette that combines the flavors of my ultimate midnight snack. My Fig, Honey and Goat Cheese Galette is perfect for those night time cravings, but it’s also wonderful as a lunch with a salad of fresh greens, at a brunch, or an appetizer with a good crisp Chardonnay. Frankly, it’s delicious any time of the day.

Fig, Honey and Goat Cheese Galette is a fig lover's dream. Nestled in a flaky, buttery crust are sweet figs, tangy goat cheese and sweet honey. Make it while fig season is here.

Note: This post first appeared July 23, 2010; the recipe has been updated from the archives with a flakier dough, improved kitchen notes and recipe annotation, and updated photographs. I hope you enjoy this favorite from my kitchen.

Fig, Honey and Goat Cheese Galette is a fig lover's dream. Nestled in a flaky, buttery crust are sweet figs, tangy goat cheese and sweet honey. Make it while fig season is here.

Fig, Honey and Goat Cheese Galette is a fig lover's dream. Nestled in a flaky, buttery crust are sweet figs, tangy goat cheese and sweet honey. Make it while fig season is here.

More Fig Recipes to Try:

Chocolate Banana Fig Bread
Fig and Almond Butter Smoothie
Fig, Jalapeno Jam and Blue Cheese Pizza
Honeyed Fig Trifle with Goat Cheese Mascarpone Yogurt Cream
Fig Balsamic Jam

Fig, Honey and Goat Cheese Galette

Makes one 8-inch rustic galette. | Prep: 15 minutes, plus chill time | Cook: 30 minutes

Fig, Honey and Goat Cheese Galette is a fig lover’s dream, and one of my favorite ways to enjoy fig season. Nestled in a flaky, buttery crust are sweet figs, tangy goat cheese and drizzles of sweet honey. I first shared this recipe when I started my blog in 2010, and have been making it each summer since.

Ingredients

Dough

  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 tablespoons granulated sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, frozen
  • 1/4 cup ice water

Filling

  • 5 oz goat cheese, room temperature
  • 2 tablespoons good quality honey, plus more for serving
  • 6-7 fresh figs, quartered (about 1 1/2 cups sliced figs)
  • 1 large egg
  • 1 tablespoon water
  • 2 teaspoons demerara sugar
  • fresh thyme leaves, for garnish

Instructions

Make the dough:

In a medium bowl, stir the flour, salt and sugar together with a fork or a whisk. Grate the butter with a box grater and add to the flour. Using your fingers, begin to work the butter into the dough until you have coarse crumbs. Stir in the water a tablespoon at a time, using a fork to incorporate it into the dough, checking it with your fingers by pinching the dough together. You can also do this with a food processor, if you wish. Do not over work the dough – you want to be able to see bits of butter within the dough, and it will still be rather shaggy and loose. Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured surface and use your hands to bring it together into a ball, but be careful not to overwork the dough. When the mixture pulls together into a ball, wrap the dough in a piece of plastic wrap, form it into a disk, and refrigerate for at least an hour or overnight.

Make the galette:

Preheat the oven to 400°F.

Roll the dough into a 10-inch disk about 1/4-inch thick on a sheet of parchment paper.

In a small bowl, use a fork to cream the goat cheese and 2 tablespoons of honey into the softened cheese. Spread in the center of the dough, leaving a 2-inch perimeter. Arrange the figs on top of the goat cheese, then fold the edge of the dough up on the figs, pleating as you make your way around the galette.

Whisk together the egg and water. Lightly brush the dough with the egg wash, and sprinkle the dough with demerara sugar. Transfer the galette with the parchment paper onto a heavy baking sheet.

Bake in the oven for about 30 minutes, or until the crust is golden brown. Remove from oven and drizzle the figs with the remaining honey, and sprinkle with fresh thyme. Let it sit for about 5 minutes before slicing. Enjoy while warm.

Notes

The dough can be prepared in advance, which can come in handy if you are making this for entertaining. Make the dough up to three days in advance (or longer, by storing tightly sealed in the freezer).

Dough based on Mini Egg Pies, Kawaling Pinoy

Comments

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  1. Natalie

    Thanks for this great recipe. I just made it – my first galette ever! Unfortunately, had a bit of a problem. When I took the galette out of the oven, the fig wedges were sitting in a small puddle of juice and dough in the middle, just under the filling, was slightly underbaked. The bottom was nice and crispy, the top was also very good (I rolled the edges a bit thinner, so they bake through when pleated). Overall it was very delicious and despite the doughy middle got devoured in a few minutes :) but I cannot serve it like that to company. Do you have any suggestions on what went wrong? Thank you!

    Reply
    • Liren Baker

      Hi Natalie,

      I’m glad to hear that the fig galette was your first attempt! To troubleshoot your issues with the middle dough, some things I can recommend to avoid an underbaked center are (1) rolling the dough out evenly , especially in the center (about 1/4-inch or even up to 1/8 inch thick) makes sure the galette will bake evenly, (2) baking the galette in the center of the oven, (3) not piling too much fruit in the center so that the heat bakes it evenly. Also, if it looks like your figs are especially juicy, that could result in juice releasing. I usually don’t have problems with this, but if that seems to be the case, you can dust the figs with cornstarch.

      I hope this helps, and good luck on your next attempt!

      Reply
      • Natalie

        Hi Liren,
        Thanks for your suggestions. My friend and I have been making galettes for two weeks in a row, trying to perfect it :) Out of your suggestions, the only one I didn’t do the first time – roll it out evenly thin. For all the following attempts I used a fondant roller with the height rings to achieve absolutely even thickness (and then rolled the edges thinner). Now I know it was the combination of very juicy figs and the very soft goat cheese that made it so soggy. I have made one more of this exact galette (same cheese and same batch of figs) and I have chilled the rolled dough for 15 mins before spreading the cheese on it, and then chilled the assembled galette for another 15-20 before baking it. It was much, much better.
        I have also made a peach galette with very juicy peaches and I sprinkled semolina on the dough and coated the peaches with cornstarch – came out perfect.
        Thank you again!

  2. Haydee

    I think that after making this beautiful galette for 4 times, it’s only fair that I finally leave a comment. Thank you so much for this recipe! It is perfect in every way. The instructions are spot on, clear, easy! I particularly love the dough because it just opens the door to many possible combinations! Thank you again x

    Reply
    • Liren Baker

      Hi Haydee! You’ve made my day – I’m so glad you’ve enjoyed the galette not just once but 4 times! Thank you for letting me know — and I couldn’t agree more about the dough – you can do so much with it!

      Reply
  3. Andrea

    Would this work using frozen figs? Or do you think they’d become a soggy mess. We have some figs from our tree that I was planning to use for a jam but this looks so much better.

    Reply
    • Liren Baker

      Great question, Andrea. I haven’t tried it with frozen figs — I am concerned that they might be soggy, but perhaps one workaround would be to arrange the figs right before you pop it in the oven. You’re so lucky to have figs from your tree! One of my favorite ways to use up frozen figs is in my Fig and Almond Butter Smoothie. Hope that helps!

      Reply
  4. Jessica Vincent

    I made a couple little tweaks–added some cinnamon and cardamom to the cheese and honey, skipped the egg wash and forgot the sugar, didn’t add thyme–but it turned out delicious. I like how the honey mellowed out the goat cheese, and it all just melded together to this rich, lightly sweet and slightly savory treat.

    Reply
    • Liren Baker

      I love the tweaks you made, Jessica, I’ll have to try adding some cinnamon and cardamom next time I make the galette. I’m so glad you enjoyed it!!

      Reply
  5. Salomon

    I love gallettes. It’s a little free-form pie. Your pairing of figs and goat cheese are perfect

    Reply
  6. Bird

    I’ve done these sort of galettes with peach, but have got to try it like this!! Loving the goat’s cheese too!

    Reply
    • Liren Baker

      Mmm, peach galettes are great! I hope you try this – the figs and goat cheese combination is one of my all time favorites.

      Reply
  7. Lynn | The Road to Honey

    Wow! I can’t believe you are the only one in your house that loves figs. Drizzled with honey . . .they really do make for the perfect little treat. Unfortunately, it’s near impossible for me to find decent figs in my area so I am usually left looking longingly at everyone else’s magnificent fig creations. This one certainly is a beauty. . .and my big question is. . .did you convert your family to fig lovers with this one?

    Reply
    • Liren Baker

      How I wish I could send some figs your way! So, I will share this — a few weeks ago, I saw my husband taste some figs AND I was able to include it in another upcoming recipe that the family loved, so the family is slowly joining me in loving figs!

      Reply
  8. Lauren Gaskill

    I can imagine that while you were making this you were doing a little happy dance because OMG Liren, this is SO BEAUTIFUL!! Seriously one of the prettiest galettes I’ve ever laid eyes on. Adding this to my regular baking favorites. <3 <3

    Reply
  9. Mammaincorsa

    Absolutely delicious! Thank you for sharing this wonderful recipe. My parents have a fig tree and every year it produces so much that they don’t know what to do with all of them! But after having tried this recipe, I know exactly what to make them to surprise them with their own harvest :)  Thanks so much!

    Reply
    • Liren Baker

      I’m so pleased! Thank you for coming back to let me know you liked it – how lucky that your parents have a fig tree – that would be a dream for me!

      Reply
  10. shy

    so this is a total beginners question, but i’ve never made anything with figs before. How do I cut the figs? Do I remove the outer portion and then cut it? Or just cut it?
    sorry…totally a beginners question :-)

    Reply
    • Liren

      So sorry for the late reply, I’ve been away! Great question – I like to just cut the stems off, then enjoy the figs sliced, skin and all. Enjoy! I just bought a bunch of figs yesterday and can’t wait to dig in.

      Reply
  11. Kathy Diaz (found baking)

    This stole my heart. I love figs! And I love fig tarts. Beautiful pictures. I like the goat cheese combination with honey and figs. Tang + Sweetness = Perfection in the mouth. I have to make your tart before summer is over… I am literally drooling.

    Reply
    • Liren

      You’ll love this, Cristina! Now that you’re a fig lover, I hope you do try it!!

      Reply
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